MLA Members Receive 2017 NEH Awards

Congratulations to the twenty-two MLA members among the winners of National Endowment for the Humanities awards announced in December 2017. The projects recognized include a study of collaborative authorship in early African American and Native American literature, the revitalization of a database on eighteenth-century theater and popular culture in London, an oral history program for high school students, and many others.

Fellowships

Katy Chiles, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Project Title: Interracial Collaboration in African American and Native American Literature of the Antebellum Period
Project Description: Completion of a book-length study of collaborative authorship in early African American and Native American literature.

Clementine Fauré-Bellaïche, Brandeis University
Project Title: André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roland Barthes, and the Religion of Literary Modernism
Project Description: Completion of a book-length study on the influence of Protestantism on French literary modernism, particularly in the writings of André Gide (1869–1951), Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–80), and Roland Barthes (1915–80).

Rachel Haywood Ferreira, Iowa State University
Project Title: Latin American Science Fiction in the Space Age, 1945–1969
Project Description: A book-length study of the science fiction genre in Latin America between 1945 and 1969.

Melissa Homestead, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Project Title: The Creative Partnership of Willa Cather and Edith Lewis
Project Description: Completion of a book-length study of the personal and professional relationship of Willa Cather and Edith Lewis.

Lauren Klein, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta
Project Title: Data by Design: An Interactive History of Data Visualization, 1786–1900
Project Description: Preparation of a Web-accessible, digital monograph examining the history of data visualization in the United States and Great Britain from the late eighteenth to early twentieth centuries.

Michele Lowrie, University of Chicago
Project Title: The Concept of Security in Ancient Roman Literature and Politics
Project Description: A book-length study of the concept of national security in Roman literature and its political trajectory from the late republican period to the early imperial era.

John Moore, University of Alabama, Birmingham
Project Title: The Legal Case of José Soller, Accused of Impersonating a Priest and Other Crimes in Seventeenth-Century Spain: A Bilingual Edition
Project Description: A bilingual critical edition and scholarly translation of the seventeenth-century legal case of José Soller, a traveler of African descent prosecuted in Galicia for impersonating a priest.

Samuel Otter, University of California, Berkeley
Project Title: Literary Form in the Works of Herman Melville, 1819–1891
Project Description: Completion of a book-length study on literary form in the works of the American author Herman Melville.

Nicole Rice, St. John’s University, New York
Project Title: Hospitals and Literary Production in England, 1350–1550
Project Description: Completion of a book-length study on late medieval English hospitals as centers of religion, literature, and civic affairs.

Azade Seyhan, Bryn Mawr College
Project Title: The Exodus of German Culture to Turkey, 1933–1945
Project Description: A book-length analysis on academic exiles from Hitler’s Germany and the Turkish higher educational institutions in which they took refuge.

Shaden Tageldin, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Project Title: Toward a Transcontinental Theory of Modern Comparative Literature
Project Description: Completion of a book-length study on the Arab-European origins of modern comparative literature.

Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Mattie Burkert, project director
Utah State University
Project Title: The London Stage Database
Project Description: The recovery and revitalization of a unique and important database, supported by NEH and other funders in the 1970s, containing information on theater and popular culture in London in the long eighteenth century (1660–1800).

John O’Brien, project codirector
Tonya Howe, project codirector
Christine Ruotolo, project codirector
University of Virginia
Project Title: Literature in Context: An Open Anthology
Project Description: Development of a working prototype for an open-access, curated, and classroom-sourced digital anthology of British and American literature in English (1650–1800).

Humanities Access Grants

Nicholas Allen, project director
University of Georgia
Project Title: An American Literary Landscape: Life, History, and Memory in Putnam County, Georgia
Project Description: An oral history program for high school students in Putnam County, Georgia, focused on the African American experience.

Common Heritage

Kelly Wisecup, project director
Northwestern University
Project Title: The American Indian Center of Chicago and Urban Native American Histories
Project Description: Three digitization events to collect local history materials and a complementary public outreach symposium focused on Native American history in Chicago.

Preservation Assistance Grants

Michael Kelly, project director
Amherst College
Project Title: Preservation Training and Supplies for Handling and Storage of Oversize Materials
Project Description: A preservation training workshop and the purchase of preservation-quality supplies to rehouse more than seventy oversize items from a variety of collections held by the Archives and Special Collections unit. Many of the items are tightly rolled inside tubes that are too small, and the library’s staff members do not have the necessary experience to remove and rehouse them safely. The items include oversize posters and prints related to the Native American literature collection as well as large-format maps and other pedagogical materials from the Natural History collection.

Awards for Faculty

William Corley, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Project Title: The Voice of the Veteran in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Project Description: Research and writing leading to publication of a book on depictions of war veterans in American literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Robert Gunn, University of Texas, El Paso
Project Title: Literature, Timekeeping, and the Production of Space in Early Western North America
Project Description: Research and writing leading to publication of a book on how European and Native inhabitants of the American West kept track of time during the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries.

Andras Kisery, CUNY Research Foundation, City College
Project Title: Forming English Literature in the Early Modern World
Project Description: Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the dissemination and consumption of English literature in and beyond England during the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries.

Sonja Watson, University of Texas, Arlington
Project Title: Globalization, Transculturation, and Hybrid Identity in Panamanian Music: Reggae en Español
Project Description: Preparation of a book-length study of the musical genre reggae en español and national and black identity in Panama, 1970s to the present.