Contribute to New MLA Volumes on Cabeza de Vaca, Shakespeare, and German Literature

The volumes Approaches to Teaching Cabeza de Vaca’s Account and Other Works, edited by Luis Fernando Restrepo and Carlos A. Jáuregui, and Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, second edition, edited by Joseph M. Ortiz, are now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Lit­erature series. Instructors who have taught these works are encouraged to contribute to the volumes by completing surveys about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of each survey.

You are also invited to submit essay proposals for a new volume in development in the Options for Teaching series, Teaching German Literature of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries, edited by David D. Kim and B. Venkat Mani. Abstracts must be submitted to the editors by 15 June 2019.

MLA Members Receive 2019 Guggenheim Award

Congratulations to the eleven MLA members among the winners of the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowships announced in April 2019. The projects recognized include a deep history of cybernetics, an exploration of United States history through the prism of the high school canon, the temporalities of ice in an epoch of climate change, and Japanese culture during the Cold War era, among others.

Fellowships

Rachel Adams, Columbia University
Field of study: literary criticism

Branka Arsić, Columbia University
Field of study: American literature

Hester Blum, Penn State University, University Park
Field of study: geography and environmental studies

Michael K. Bourdaghs, University of Chicago
Field of study: East Asian studies

Michael W. Clune, Case Western Reserve University
Field of study: literary criticism

Alexander R. Galloway, New York University
Field of study: film, video, and new media studies

Marjorie Garber, Harvard University
Field of study: English literature

Elizabeth Carolyn Miller, University of California, Davis
Field of study: English literature

Andrew Newman, Stony Brook University, State University of New York
Field of study: education

Gerard Passannante, University of Maryland, College Park
Field of study: medieval and Renaissance literature

John Durham Peters, Yale University
Field of study: film, video, and new media studies

May and June Deadlines for MLA Publication Prizes

The MLA Committee on Honors and Awards invites authors and editors to compete for the association’s publication awards. There are eleven prizes with a 1 May deadline, and one prize has a 1 June deadline. Information on all the annual and biennial MLA prizes, their deadlines, and the submission process is available online. You may also request detailed information on individual MLA prizes by contacting the office of programs (awards@mla.org).

Contribute to New MLA Volumes

The volume Approaches to Teaching Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, edited by Kimberly C. Reed, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Lit­erature series. Instructors who have taught these works are encouraged to contribute to the volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 1 June 2019.

You are also invited to submit essay proposals for a new nonseries volume in development, The Futures of Neurodiversity, edited by Elizabeth J. Donaldson, Ralph Savarese, and Melanie Yergeau. Abstracts must be submitted to the editors by 1 June 2019.

Contribute to an MLA Approaches Volume on the Epic of Gilgamesh

The volume Approaches to Teaching the Epic of Gilgamesh, edited by David Damrosch and Sophus Helle, is now in development in the MLA series Approaches to Teaching World Literature. Instructors who have taught this work are encouraged to contribute to the volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey.

Contribute to an MLA Approaches Volume on Teaching the Sonnet

The volume Approaches to Teaching the Sonnet, edited by Joshua Reid, is now in development in the MLA series Approaches to Teaching World Literature. Instructors who have taught the sonnet are encouraged to contribute to the volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey.

Upcoming Deadlines for MLA Publication Prizes

The MLA Committee on Honors and Awards invites authors and editors to compete for the association’s publication awards. The James Russell Lowell Prize and the MLA Prize for a First Book have a 1 March deadline, and there are three prizes with a 1 April deadline. Information on all the annual and biennial MLA prizes, their deadlines, and the submission process is available online. You may also request detailed information on individual MLA prizes by contacting the office of programs (awards@mla.org).

Contribute to an MLA Approaches Volume on Teaching Dickinson’s Poetry

The volume Approaches to Teaching Dickinson’s Poetry, second edition, edited by Martha Nell Smith, is now in development in the MLA series Approaches to Teaching World Literature. Instructors who have taught these works are encouraged to contribute to the volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey.

2020 Presidential Theme: Being Human

Simon Gikandi, the 2019–20 president of the MLA, has chosen Being Human as the presidential theme for the 2020 MLA Annual Conven­tion in Seattle.

The theme invites members to reflect on the role of literature and language in defining the nature of the human in the face of what appears to be its diminishment and to provoke debates on the role of the humanities in a changing world. What has been the role of the creative imagination in marking out the social spaces of what we call humanity? How has literature been called upon to bear witnesses to both the possibility and limits of the human in the modern world? How has the human condition been thought and written about in diverse historical periods and geographic spaces? Can literature and its criticism continue to inspire the desire for human freedom in an age of intolerance? What is the role of a diverse community of writers and readers in the thinking of the world and our relation to it?

Members are encouraged to think about these questions from the greatest range of perspectives possible—ethics and ethnicity, linguistics and literary history, environmental studies, gender and sexuality studies, queer theory, criticism, writing, composition studies, pedagogy, public culture, and civic engagement. In addition to the main theme, panels can be imagined in a number of clusters and subthemes: defining the human, literature and human rights, citizenship and belonging, technology and the new media, encounters in the classroom and workplace, and the public sphere.

Visit the MLA Web site to post a call for papers for the 2020 convention.